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The Forbidden City

01 Jun, 2009

A Trip To The Forbidden City of China

Forbidden City

The Forbidden City is one of the most known landmarks of China; infamous worldwide due to its long and controversial history, it used to be the Chinese imperial Palace, from the Ming Dynasty until the end of the Qing Dynasty, when the last Emperor of China was sent away. It was the main house of the emperor and his family, as well as the political hub of the Chinese rulers.

Its construction started in 1406 during the reign of the Yongle, part of the Ming Dynasty and finished by the end of 1420. The Forbidden City is a large complex of 980 buildings and covers almost 700,000 sq meters. The complex is built following the traditional Chinese architecture, although there are evident indications of the Eastern Asian architecture as well. According to the historical facts you can find in any travel guide the construction required the participation of over a million workers. Stone and other materials were quarried and brought from Fang shan, an area close to Beijing, while the bricks were made of white lime and rice with gluten. According to the experts, the use of such materials made the walls exceptionally strong.

The predominant color on the walls and in the buildings is yellow, as this was the symbol of the royal families; paintings, decorations and ground bricks bear this color.

Today the Forbidden City is open to the public, as tourists travel to Beijing in order to see this historical complex of buildings. It is considered to be the major attraction in Beijing. Since 1987 it is listed in UNESCO’s large collection of preserved sites in the world. It boasts a vast collection of artifacts and artwork from the Emperors’ Era, although a large number of the findings in the buildings are exhibited now in Taipei, at the National Museum.

Forbidden City

Forbidden City

Forbidden City

Forbidden City

Forbidden City

Forbidden City

Forbidden City

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