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Miami River

18 May, 2009

The Miami River: Reflections of A City

Miami River

The Miami River is one of the most important rivers that run through the State of Florida. It is a 9 kilometres river that flows from the famous Miami Canal situated at the Miami Airport, to the Biscayne Bay, one of the most scenic places in the State. The river used to be natural, deriving from Dade County; Native Americans had their settlements at the banks of the river, however the development of the state and the city of Miami obliged the officials to find a way to change the course of the river, which was quite polluted.

The mouth of the Miami River houses now the Coastal Officials of the city; numerous businesses are also located there, while the residents of the city are putting increasingly big pressure to the officials to preserve the River and improve its condition.

The name of the River, as well as the City itself is believed to have Native American Influences; according to the Indian language the word ‘Mayami’ refers to the sweeter water. Some others believe that the word means long water however the official name was given just in 1835. Before that the river was known as Rio Ratones or Sweetwater River. There are also some references of it as the River Lemon.

According to the locals, except for being an important commercial hub, the Miami River plays another role in the city; it divides the wealthy and poorer neighbourhoods of Miami City, although not everyone seems to support this opinion. In any case though at the western banks of the river lie numerous restaurants, clubs and bars, as well as big businesses. If you open a travel guide about the City of Miami, you will most definitely find recommendations on places to visit along the banks of the Miami River.

Miami River

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