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Ferry Reach

14 May, 2009

Look back at History in Ferry Reach, Bermuda

Ferry Reach

Named for its ferry rides between St. George Island and Bermuda, Ferry Reach is situated on the northeast corner of Bermuda. No longer is it a place where soldiers once used to keep the enemy at bay in its 40 foot towers. Extensive training for the Bermuda Regiment is still going on here. There are actually three different forts for your exploring travel. It’s a great place to hike through the trails and take your time in each one.

Consult your travel guide for information about the Martello tower. This is a famous landmark at Ferry Reach. It was built the British in the 19 century. These round structures were solid masonry. With their thick walls and round shape they could withstand cannon fire. From their tops they would hold their own artillery to ward of their enemies. Many of them were buried in one of two cemeteries at the park. Many died from their military injuries, but just as many died from a yellow fever epidemic. Beside the tower is what is called the Magazine where gun powder was stored. It is made out of the soft sand of Bermuda. The only one of its kind to survive. One of the fort tours won’t be much to see, as the original buildings are no longer standing.

The Bermuda railroad goes right through Ferry Reach Park. You will even see an old railway station where long ago a separate railway was built by a man to connect to the main railroad. From the tip of the island you can look out and see beautiful seas and the airport in the distance. If you look off to the east and see some big ships coming in, these tankers are the main source of Bermuda fuel. This area is known as the “Oil Docks”, is home to large fuel facilities for major oil companies.

Ferry Reach

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