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Hiroshima

05 May, 2009

Hiroshima, from a Bombing Place to an Economic Wonder

Hiroshima

Hiroshima is the largest city in the Chugoku region of western Honshu, one of Japan’s islands. It is best known for the nuclear bombing during the World War II, when it was attacked by the United States of America. The city covers an area of almost 1000 square kilometers and hosts over 1 million people, giving it a density of over 1200 people / square kilometer. During the war, there were over 200000 deaths, mostly civilians. As if the nuclear bombing wasn’t enough, Hiroshima was struck by the Makurazaki Typhoon that caused another 3000 deaths.

The city was rebuilt after the war, step by step, and it was proclaimed a City of Peace in 1949. It hosts the Peace Memorial Park. The city has greatly improved after the war. The population has risen from 137000 after the war to over 1 million. The economy has also improved. The most dominant company in the city is Mazda Motor Company, now, owned by Ford Motor Company. It also has many innovative companies involved in new fields of activity such as HIVEC. Hiroshima is one of the most evolved cities in the world. The cost of living is lower even than in Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto or Fukuoka. The university in the city was establish in 1949, and combined 8 former universities into a single, big one.

The city has many tourist attractions like: Museum of Art, Peace Memorial Park, City Museum of Contemporary Art, Shukkei-en Gardens and the Hijiyama Park.

There are many festivals like the Flower Festival or the International Animation Festival. If you want to experience something new, you can try the Japanese cuisine. Hiroshima is best known for okonomiyaki. If you want to travel in the city, you can use a streetcar called “Hiroden”. The “Hiroden” streetcar is an old concept, but the construction of a subway system was too complicated because the city is located on a delta.

Hiroshima

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